High-Intensity Physical Activity in Early Adolescence Could Lead to Stronger Bones in Adulthood

*The following is excerpted from an online article posted on MedicalXpress.

High-intensity physical activity in early life might help maximize peak hip strength and prevent osteoporosis in later life, according to a study from University of Bristol researchers published in JAMA Network Open.

The research, which analyzed data from 2,569 participants of the Children of the 90s health study, found that more time spent doing moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) from age 12 years was associated with stronger hips at age 25 years, whereas time spent in light intensity activity was less clearly associated with adult hip strength.

Peak bone mass occurs in young adulthood and is considered to be a marker of the risk of fracture and osteoporosis in later life. Hip fractures make up a large proportion of the osteoporosis disease burden.

Researchers also found evidence to suggest that adolescent MVPA was more important than MVPA in adulthood and that MVPA in early adolescence may be more important than in later adolescence. There was also some evidence that higher impact activity (consistent with jumping; assessed once in a subsample in late adolescence using a custom accelerometer) was related to stronger hips at age 25.

Source: MedicalXpress
https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-08-high-intensity-physical-early-adolescence-stronger.html